4 stars · Book Reviews · mental health · non-fiction · Self Care

Review | The Gratitude Explorer Workbook

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The Gratitude Explorer Workbook by Kristi Nelson
Storey Publishing, LLC 2021
Non-Fiction
4/5 Stars

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Thank you to Netgalley and Storey Publishing for the Advanced Copy! The Gratitude Explorer Workbook will be released on November 23rd, 2021.

GoodReads Synopsis:

A Network for Grateful Living, creators of the best-selling Everyday Gratitude and Wake Up Grateful present a distinctive workbook for readers who want to start a gratitude practice or integrate gratitude into their lives with greater intention and consistency. This interactive package acts as both a guide and a journal for recording thoughts and meditations. Dozens of writing prompts, guided meditations, and exercises for beginning and progressively deepening a daily gratitude practice are paired with quotations and space for writing and personalizing the book. The beautifully designed gift package includes bonus features in the back: 10 quotation postcards, mini-cards for keeping in a wallet or leaving for others, conversation starters, gold star stickers and reusable affirmation stickers, as well as die-cut bookmarks for each section of the book.

Review:

I really enjoyed this book. It’s a fantastic introduction to gratitude practice and I loved the exercises, quotes, and art that was included.

Every time I’ve been in the hospital, or intensive therapy, expressing our gratitude has played a part in our treatment. Of course there’s therapy and medication management as well, but patients were encouraged to either say or write what we are grateful for. And when you’re in a place mentally where hospitalization or intensive therapy is necessary, finding and expressing is both extremely difficult (sometimes it feels impossible!), but also vital for healing.

I also try to practice gratitude every day. Part of my morning routine is writing three things that I’m grateful, and I try to do it again before going to bed.

This book definitely supplemented my existing practice, and helped me think outside the box in terms of all that I have to be grateful for!

Perfect for anyone who wants to begin a gratitude practice, but doesn’t know where to start.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

5 Stars · Book Reviews · non-fiction

Review | We’re Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation

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We’re Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation by Eric Michael Garcia
Mariner Books, 2021
Non-Fiction
288 pages
5/5 Stars

Thank you to Netgalley and Mariner Books for the Advanced Copy! We’re Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation was released in August, 2021.

Trigger Warnings: Ableism, Autism Parenting, Mentions of Autism Speaks and other similar charities looking to “cure” autism.

GoodReads Synopsis:

Autistic person and journalist Eric Garcia brings an insider’s perspective and a reporter’s eye to show that autism is a vital part of his community’s humanity, not a disease that needs to be cured. 

Review:

When I first saw that this book was available on NetGalley, I immediately requested it. As someone who is also Neurodivergent (and follows a lot of Autistic content creators across several platforms), I have been very interested in the conversation surround Autism and Autistic people.

I am so grateful that I received the ARC, because this book was fantastic. It was educational, informative, and also gave me a lot to think about in regards to my own neurodivergency and internalized ableism.

The big takeaway I got from this book is that their is a lack of resources for Autistic people, and that lack of resources is harming not only Autistic people, but everyone. Autistic people need support just like everyone else, and the lack of that is hurting Autistic people, creating a stigma against Autism, creating stereotypes about Autistic people, and denying society of the gifts and talents that each Autistic person has to give the world.

Perfect for people who know (or don’t know and are just finding out!) that you don’t support Autism Speaks, and get weird vibes from the stereotypical “Autism Mom”.

Rating: 5 out of 5.