3 stars · Book Reviews · non-fiction

Review | The Hidden Power of F*cking Up

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The Hidden Power of F*cking Up by The Try Guys
Dey Street Books, 2019
Non-Fiction
288 pages
3/5 Stars

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Trigger Warnings: Mention of racism, homophobia, childhood mental illness, diet culture.

GoodReads Synopsis:

The Try Guys deliver their first book—an inspirational self-improvement guide that teaches you that the path to success is littered with humiliating detours, embarrassing mistakes, and unexpected failures.

To be our best selves, we must become secure in our insecurities. In The Hidden Power of F*cking Up, The Try Guys – Keith, Ned, Zach, and Eugene – reveal their philosophy of trying: how to fully embrace fear, foolishness, and embarrassment in an effort to understand how we all get paralyzed by a fear of failure. They’ll share how four shy, nerdy kids have dealt with their most poignant life struggles by attacking them head-on and reveal their – ahem – sure-fail strategies for achieving success.

But they’re not just here to talk; they’re actually going to put their advice to work. To demonstrate their unique self-improvement formula, they’ll each personally confront their deepest insecurities. A die-hard meat-lover goes vegan for the first time. A straight-laced father transforms into a fashionista. A perpetually single sidekick becomes the romantic lead. A child of divorce finally grows more intimate with his family. Through their insightful, emotional journeys and surprising, hilarious anecdotes, they’ll help you overcome your own self-doubt to become the best, most f*cked up version of yourself you can be!

Review:

Let me start by saying that I’m a pretty big fan of the Try Guys. I’m not like, a die hard fan, nor can I say that I’ve seen every single one of their videos or anything like that… but I really like them, and I know all of their partners’ names, so I think that qualifies me as a ‘pretty big fan’.

That being said, I was really disappointed by this book. I listened to the audiobook, and I thought I would love it, because I enjoyed the few episodes of their podcast that I listened to, but I felt like the narrator changed too often without being identified, which confused me.

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There was also a lot of diet culture talk which I found extremely disappointing. For example, Keith was talking about how since eating less meat and exercising more frequently, he feels so much more healthy… and then immediately followed that with how he’s lost a pants size. He then goes on to say that it’s about health, not weight loss, which simply isn’t true if he found his weight loss meaningful enough to mention in his book.

I also was disappointed that the guys never seemed to acknowledge the privilege behind many of their suggestions and experiences. This was super disappointing to me, because I never get that vibe from their videos. In their videos, they seem to be very aware of their privileges and mention it when necessary, but they seemed just so out of touch in this book, and it made me really sad.

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Similarly, many of their suggestions and experiences don’t seem to take things like mental health or class into account. The only mention of mental illness and health is when Zach talks about his experience with major depression as a child, which don’t get me wrong, was very interesting. But none of the guys really talked about how they take care of their mental health as adults besides exercise and meditation (which are very good things, but many, many people need medication, therapy, or other treatments for their mental health). A lot of their suggestions simply don’t seem sustainable for those who struggle with their mental health more than they do.

I still like the Try Guys. I still plan on watching their videos, but this book didn’t seem to be written by the same men you see on YouTube.

Perfect for Try Guys fans who watch the videos and think “wow, I really wish these guys were less likable.”

Rating: 3 out of 5.
3 stars · romance

Review | Float Plan

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Float Plan by Trish Doller
St. Martin’s Griffin 2021
Romance
272 pages
3/5 Stars

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Trigger Warnings: Suicide, Addiction, Self-harm

GoodReads Synopsis:

Critically acclaimed author Trish Doller’s unforgettable and romantic adult debut about setting sail, starting over, and finding yourself…

Since the loss of her fiancé, Anna has been shipwrecked by grief—until a reminder goes off about a trip they were supposed to take together. Impulsively, Anna goes to sea in their sailboat, intending to complete the voyage alone.

But after a treacherous night’s sail, she realizes she can’t do it by herself and hires Keane, a professional sailor, to help. Much like Anna, Keane is struggling with a very different future than the one he had planned. As romance rises with the tide, they discover that it’s never too late to chart a new course.

In Trish Doller’s unforgettable Float Plan, starting over doesn’t mean letting go of your past, it means making room for your future.

Review:

When I was a little girl, my grandfather took my sister and I sailing in the Hudson River. We cried the entire time as the boat rocked back and forth in the New York night. I hated every minute. Meanwhile my grandfather was a sailor who had sailed the Caribbean and had sailing in his blood, so he enjoyed it immensely.

But. This book made me want to give sailing another shot so that I can sail the Caribbean and find myself. Okay, fine. Find the handsome Irish sailor of my dreams.

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This was a lovely book. I really appreciated Anna and Keane’s adventure and their growth as individuals. Is Keane the man of my dreams? I mean, he is Irish Catholic, and I’m Irish American Catholic, so probably.

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Please note that there were graphic mentions of suicide at times, which I found unnecessary and triggering, but also understood that it made sense for Anna’s inner monologue.

Perfect for dreamers and people looking to let go of the past.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

3 stars · Book Reviews · literary fiction

Review | Normal People

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Normal People by Sally Rooney
Hogarth Press, 2019
Literary Fiction
273 pages
3/5 Stars

Katie, a white woman, holds a copy of "Normal People" by Sally Rooney.

Trigger Warnings: Abuse, suicide, self-harm.

GoodReads Synopsis

At school Connell and Marianne pretend not to know each other. He’s popular and well-adjusted, star of the school soccer team while she is lonely, proud, and intensely private. But when Connell comes to pick his mother up from her housekeeping job at Marianne’s house, a strange and indelible connection grows between the two teenagers – one they are determined to conceal.

A year later, they’re both studying at Trinity College in Dublin. Marianne has found her feet in a new social world while Connell hangs at the sidelines, shy and uncertain. Throughout their years in college, Marianne and Connell circle one another, straying toward other people and possibilities but always magnetically, irresistibly drawn back together. Then, as she veers into self-destruction and he begins to search for meaning elsewhere, each must confront how far they are willing to go to save the other.

Sally Rooney brings her brilliant psychological acuity and perfectly spare prose to a story that explores the subtleties of class, the electricity of first love, and the complex entanglements of family and friendship.

Review

This book took me on a roller coaster ride of emotions and opinions and thoughts. This book was… a lot.

I started out absolutely loving it. The way it was written reminded me of a lot of the books I read as an English major in college, and it took me back. And then… it got weird.

There was a lot of unexpected stuff. Not plot twist unexpected, more like wait where did this come from and why is this being brought up unexpected. it was a lot. I found it difficult to read and seriously thought about DNFing it, but I’m actually glad I didn’t.

While the ending wasn’t what I wanted, it was realistic and also hopeful enough to make me feel like the characters weren’t completely shitty people. If you’ve hung out here a bit, you’ll know I’m a sucker for a good ending. While this ending didn’t redeem the book entirely for me, it did help me appreciate it and the characters a little more.

But not enough to want to watch the Hulu series. I’ve had enough of Marianne and Connell.

Perfect for former English majors who want to relive their glory days.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

5 Stars · Book Reviews · fantasy

Review | Ella Enchanted

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Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
Scholastic Books, 1998
Fantasy
232 pages
5/5 Stars

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Katie's iPhone, showing the audiobook of "Ella Enchanted" by Gail Carson Levine is on a blue background and surrounded by a variety of items - including a purple candle, a bamboo plant, and a Belle (Disney Princess from "Beauty and the Beast") bookmark.

GoodReads Synopsis

At birth, Ella is inadvertently cursed by an imprudent young fairy named Lucinda, who bestows on her the “gift” of obedience. Anything anyone tells her to do, Ella must obey. Another girl might have been cowed by this affliction, but not feisty Ella: “Instead of making me docile, Lucinda’s curse made a rebel of me. Or perhaps I was that way naturally.” When her beloved mother dies, leaving her in the care of a mostly absent and avaricious father, and later, a loathsome stepmother and two treacherous stepsisters, Ella’s life and well-being seem to be in grave peril. But her intelligence and saucy nature keep her in good stead as she sets out on a quest for freedom and self-discovery as she tries to track down Lucinda to undo the curse, fending off ogres, befriending elves, and falling in love with a prince along the way. Yes, there is a pumpkin coach, a glass slipper, and a happily ever after, but this is the most remarkable, delightful, and profound version of Cinderella you’ll ever read.

Gail Carson Levine’s examination of traditional female roles in fairy tales takes some satisfying twists and deviations from the original. Ella is bound by obedience against her will, and takes matters in her own hands with ambition and verve. Her relationship with the prince is balanced and based on humor and mutual respect; in fact, it is she who ultimately rescues him. Ella Enchanted has won many well-deserved awards, including a Newbery Honor.

Review

Once upon a time, a little girl read this book, and it enchanted her, and she knew that one day, she would write books that enchanted others, too.

Fast forward almost twenty years, she hasn’t written any books (yet), but she did decide to re-read this book that had inspired her dreams all those years ago.

Anyway, the girl is me, if ya’ll didn’t figure it out.

Ella Enchanted was one of my all time favorite books as a kiddo, and when I first downloaded Libby through my library, the audiobook was one of the first books I borrowed. I listened to it while I waited for my first COVID vaccine (get vaccinated!) and ya’ll, even as an adult, this book is magical.

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And as an adult, the magic is difference. Ella’s curse to always be obedient no longer is just what it appears to be on the surface. As an adult, you realize that this curse doesn’t just exist in children’s literature. Women, even today, have always been born with the expectation to be obedient.

The book was so much more profound with this realization. The one thing I didn’t really love about the book was the ending. It still gave me the impression that a woman needs a man, and for a fairytale that screams ‘girl power!’, I thought it could be better. It wasn’t just that she ended up with Prince Char (which, I definitely don’t blame her for. He was one of my very first fictional boyfriends.), but rather how much weight Char’s existence had on her finally being freed from the curse.

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But besides that, this book was such a fun throwback, and re-reading it was a great way to care for my inner child.

Perfect for readers who never outgrew their princess phase.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

5 Stars · Book Reviews · romance

Review | Get a Life, Chloe Brown

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Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert
Avon, 2019
Romance
373 pages
5/5 Stars

Trigger Warnings: PTSD, Chronic illness, Aftermath of abusive relationship (Talia Hibbert does include a content warning at the beginning of her books, bless her.)

GoodReads Synopsis

Chloe Brown is a chronically ill computer geek with a goal, a plan, and a list. After almost—but not quite—dying, she’s come up with seven directives to help her “Get a Life”, and she’s already completed the first: finally moving out of her glamorous family’s mansion. The next items?

• Enjoy a drunken night out.
• Ride a motorcycle.
• Go camping.
• Have meaningless but thoroughly enjoyable sex.
• Travel the world with nothing but hand luggage.
• And… do something bad.

But it’s not easy being bad, even when you’ve written step-by-step guidelines on how to do it correctly. What Chloe needs is a teacher, and she knows just the man for the job.

Redford ‘Red’ Morgan is a handyman with tattoos, a motorcycle, and more sex appeal than ten-thousand Hollywood heartthrobs. He’s also an artist who paints at night and hides his work in the light of day, which Chloe knows because she spies on him occasionally. Just the teeniest, tiniest bit.

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But when she enlists Red in her mission to rebel, she learns things about him that no spy session could teach her. Like why he clearly resents Chloe’s wealthy background. And why he never shows his art to anyone. And what really lies beneath his rough exterior…

Review

I actually read this book for the first time in August or September of 2020, but I wasn’t regularly blogging then. Since it was immediately one of my favorite reads and I had a lot of thoughts on it, I decided to re-read it so I could give you an up-to-date review with my thoughts. It was also one of the first romance books I read that made me think, “Wait… I really like this genre….” I always kind of read and viewed romance books as cheap entertainment before that, which I now realize is an opinion based on my own internalized misogyny.

The re-read was worth it, and the book still lives up to the hype in my opinion. The romance is just as sweet and heartwarming the second time. The sex scenes are still as steamy the second read, but a little less shocking (not a bad thing.). Red and Chloe were just as amazing the second read, and now that I own all of the Brown sister books (I haven’t read the last one yet!), I paid more attention whenever Dani and Eve were featured.

I do want to say this book has WAY steamier sex scenes than I’d thought before reading it. I always read sexy scenes in secret and felt ashamed of it. Yay purity culture (Maybe I’ll talk more on that later.)! I remember reading it at the hotel with my mom and clutching my metaphorical pearls at the explicit language and imagery in the sex scenes. That’s something I liked a little better during my re-read, I was a little less scandalized.

This is also probably one of my most recommended books. I feel like I recommend it to almost everybody. I have a friend who has almost identical taste in books as me (Hi, Michelle!) and I think I’ve recommended it to her like five times?!

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Perfect for lonely hearts after a year of quarantine and readers who wish Mr. Darcy was real.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

4 stars · Book Reviews · Reading · romance

Review | It Ends With Us

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase an item using my link, I will receive a small commission with no extra cost to you.

It Ends With Us by Colleen Hoover
Atria Books, 2016
Romance
385 pages
4/5 Stars

Trigger Warnings: Emotional Abuse, Homelessness, Physical Abuse, Sexual Assault.

GoodReads Synopsis

Sometimes it is the one who loves you who hurts you the most.

Lily hasn’t always had it easy, but that’s never stopped her from working hard for the life she wants. She’s come a long way from the small town in Maine where she grew up
— she graduated from college, moved to Boston, and started her own business. So when she feels a spark with a gorgeous neurosurgeon named Ryle Kincaid, everything in Lily’s life suddenly seems almost too good to be true.

Ryle is assertive, stubborn, maybe even a little arrogant. He’s also sensitive, brilliant, and has a total soft spot for Lily. And the way he looks in scrubs certainly doesn’t hurt. Lily can’t get him out of her head. But Ryle’s complete aversion to relationships is disturbing. Even as Lily finds herself becoming the exception to his “no dating” rule, she can’t help but wonder what made him that way in the first place.

As questions about her new relationship overwhelm her, so do thoughts of Atlas Corrigan — her first love and a link to the past she left behind. He was her kindred spirit, her protector. When Atlas suddenly reappears, everything Lily has built with Ryle is threatened.

Review

Whoa. This book just… wow. I read it for book club, and until this month, the majority of our reads have been light fluffy reads.

This was the complete opposite. This was a heavy read that covered heavy topics. I went in pretty blind to this, so all that I really knew about the book was what the synopsis told me.

Despite it being a difficult read, it was a smooth one. I felt like I was devouring the book in no time at all. This was my first Colleen Hoover book, but I’ve heard that a lot of her books read like this.

As a survivor of emotional abuse, so many parts resonated with me, and I thought that Hoover did a fantastic job of showing why abuse survivors don’t “just leave” without victimizing the survivor or villainizing the abuser. Both Lily and her abuser are complex characters with flaws and strengths.

There was one part where the abuser reveals some past trauma, which shed some light onto why he does what he does. It was done in a delicate way, not excusing his behavior (there is never an excuse for abusive behavior), rather explaining it. This is a sad reality of abuse that I appreciated being mentioned in the book.

The one aspect that really made me laugh were the references to Ellen DeGeneres. Those aged like sour milk, unfortunately.

Perfect for late night readers who need a good cry.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

5 Stars · Book Reviews · non-fiction · Reading

Review | Wordslut

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase an item using my link, I will receive a small commission with no extra cost to you.

Wordslut by Amanda Montell
Harper Wave, 2019
Non-Fiction
304 pages
5/5 Stars

GoodReads Synopsis:

The word “bitch” conjures many images for many people but is most often meant to describe an unpleasant woman. Even before its usage to mean a female canine, bitch didn’t refer to gender at all—it originated as a gender-neutral word meaning genitalia. A perfectly innocuous word devolving into a female insult is the case for tons more terms, including hussy, which simply meant “housewife,” or slut, which meant “untidy” and was also used to describe men. These words are just a few among history’s many English slurs hurled at women. 

Amanda Montell, feminist linguist and staff features editor at online beauty and health magazine Byrdie.com, deconstructs language—from insults and cursing to grammar and pronunciation patterns—to reveal the ways it has been used for centuries to keep women form gaining equality. Ever wonder why so many people are annoyed when women use the word “like” as a filler? Or why certain gender neutral terms stick and others don’t? Or even how linguists have historically discussed women’s speech patterns? Wordslut is no stuffy academic study; Montell’s irresistible humor shines through, making linguistics not only approachable but both downright hilarious and profound.

Review:

I have no idea how I found this book, but I am so glad that I did.

A really big part of my personality are the facts that I’m a raging feminist, and also that I majored in English in college. This book perfectly married two of my maybe four personality traits.

Montell uses humor to explain the history of the English language and the patriarchal background behind many of the words we use.

One of the most interesting parts for me was when she debunked myths behind women’s speech patterns. Different speech patterns that are commonly used by women are often looked at as being ‘unprofessional’, but Montell explains why this isn’t necessarily true. It reminded me of the time a former coworker told me that she didn’t get a promotion because our male manager told her she used the word ‘like’ too much. I now know that using ‘like’ a lot in speech has nothing to do with the speaker’s intelligence, or ability to communicate effectively, and more to do with what exactly they are trying to communicate.

Another part I loved was the part about the history of swearing. I swear like a pirate. My favorite word starts with an ‘f’ and has four letters, and I use it more than is socially appropriate. I also really don’t care. It’s the only word that can properly express my excitement, frustration, sadness, etc. Thank God for the ‘f’ word.

But. Did you know. There is a HUGE difference behind why women swear and why men swear? For men, it’s a normal part of speech, and is rarely given a second thought. When women swear, they are doing so to express a personality, their individuality, humor, and/or a negotiation of their femininity.

I could honestly go on forever about this book. It was so interesting, and I learned so much. I guess I have to put every feminist book about language on my waiting list at the library.

Perfect for Feminist Word Nerds and Washed Up English Majors.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

5 Stars · Book Reviews · non-fiction · politics · Reading

Review | Where the Light Enters

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase an item using my link, I will receive a small commission with no extra cost to you.

Where the Light Enters by Jill Biden
Flatiron Books, 2019
Non-Fiction
210 pages
5/5 Stars

GoodReads Synopsis

An intimate look at the love that built the Biden family and the delicate balancing act of the woman at its center.

“How did you get this number?” Those were the first words Jill Biden spoke to U.S. senator Joe Biden when he called her out of the blue to ask her on a date.

Growing up, Jill had wanted two things: a marriage like her parents’ – strong, loving, and full of laughter – and a career. An early heartbreak had left her uncertain about love, until she met Joe. But as they grew closer, Jill faced difficult questions: How would politics shape her family and professional life? And was she ready to become a mother to Joe’s two young sons?

She soon found herself falling in love with her three “boys,” learning to balance life as a mother, wife, educator, and political spouse. Through the challenges of public scrutiny, complicated family dynamics, and personal losses, she grew alongside her family, and she extended the family circle at every turn: with her students, military families, friends and staff at the White House, and more.

This is the story of how Jill built a family – and a life – of her own. From the pranks she played to keep everyone laughing to the traditions she formed that would carry them through tragedy, hers is the spirited journey of a woman embracing many roles.

‘WHERE THE LIGHT ENTERS’ is a candid, heartwarming glimpse into the creation of a beloved American family, and the life of a woman at its center.

Review:

I got this book a few weeks ago when Audible was having a 2-for-1 sale on select books. I voted for Biden, though I’m not his biggest fan (Being on TikTok over the summer pretty much turned me into a complete Leftist.) and I didn’t know anything about Jill Biden besides that she’s a teacher. And what that one scene of Leslie and Ben going to the White House to play Charades with Joe and Jill showed in Parks and Rec.

So, all I knew about Jill Biden was that she was a teacher, and that she thought Leslie Knope was too competitive.

Jill is an extraordinary woman. Her story follows her from her family background and childhood to her rebellious teenaged years (which to her time as the Second Lady of the United States being a rebellious teenager (which was my favorite thing, honestly) to the Second Lady (This was written before the 2020 election!) of the United States. It shows how she and Joe met (which might be my all-time favorite meet-cute, oh my God.) and how she became a mother to his sons (Fun fact, Joe proposed FIVE times before Jill agreed to marry him.)

I loved how this book was written, and since I listened to it on Audible, I got to hear Jill her story herself. I learned so much about her, Joe, and the rest of the Biden family (If a Biden is reading this, please adopt me.). She is down to earth, and takes her jobs as mother, grandmother, teacher, wife, and Second Lady very seriously. But never ever reluctantly. The way that she speaks of the work that she does, and the way she speaks about her family shows how much she loves all of it, despite the difficulties she experiences attimes.

This book is a beautiful story of how The Bidens we see in the White House became a family. It’s a story of loss and grief, of new beginnings, of faith, but mostly of love.

Recommended For: Anyone who voted for Biden and people who love stories of close and loving families.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

4 stars · Book Reviews · Reading · Uncategorized · young adult

Review | With the Fire on High

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase an item using my link, I will receive a small commission with no extra cost to you.

With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo
Quill Tree Books, 2019
Young Adult
400 pages
4/5 Stars

GoodReads Synopsis:

With her daughter to care for and her abuela to help support, high school senior Emoni Santiago has to make the tough decisions, and do what must be done. The one place she can let her responsibilities go is in the kitchen, where she adds a little something magical to everything she cooks, turning her food into straight-up goodness. Still, she knows she doesn’t have enough time for her school’s new culinary arts class, doesn’t have the money for the class’s trip to Spain — and shouldn’t still be dreaming of someday working in a real kitchen. But even with all the rules she has for her life — and all the rules everyone expects her to play by — once Emoni starts cooking, her only real choice is to let her talent break free.

Review:

So, this was a hard book for me to rate. I went between four and five stars no less than three times, I swear. I really enjoyed it. The audiobook was incredible, and the imagery and descriptions really transported me. I loved the story. I loved the characters.

But. The ending disappointed me. I’m not sure what it is, exactly, it’s a fine ending!

I just felt like something was missing. It left me really wanting more in terms of Emoni’s journey, and not in a good way.

Besides that, though, I really enjoyed the book. I loved Pretty Leslie’s redemption arc, and when Emoni was cooking, I could truly feel her love and passion for expressing herself through food and creating food that moves people.

Perfect for aspiring chefs, foodies, and fans of ‘Waitress’ the musical.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

4 stars · Book Reviews · Reading · young adult

Review | The Girls I’ve Been

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase an item using my link, I will receive a small commission with no extra cost to you.

The Girls I’ve Been by Tess Sharpe
G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers, 2021
Young Adult
336 pages
4/5 Stars

Trigger Warnings: violence, abuse.

GoodReads Synopsis

Nora O’Malley’s been a lot of girls. As the daughter of a con-artist who targets criminal men, she grew up as her mother’s protégé. But when mom fell for the mark instead of conning him, Nora pulled the ultimate con: escape.

For five years Nora’s been playing at normal. But she needs to dust off the skills she ditched because she has three problems:

#1: Her ex walked in on her with her girlfriend. Even though they’re all friends, Wes didn’t know about her and Iris.

#2: The morning after Wes finds them kissing, they all have to meet to deposit the fundraiser money they raised at the bank. It’s a nightmare that goes from awkward to deadly, because:

#3: Right after they enter bank, two guys start robbing it.

The bank robbers may be trouble, but Nora’s something else entirely. They have no idea who they’re really holding hostage…

Review

I’m usually not a thriller reader, but when I saw this on Instagram, I knew I had to read it. A reformed con AND bisexual representation?? I don’t know, that sounds pretty perfect to me.

And I was NOT disappointed. This book had me on the edge of my seat wondering what was going to happen next. It was absolutely incredible to watch Nora use the lessons she’d learned from the girls she’d been (get it?!) to save her and her friends’ lives. She is clever, crafty and quick, and because of her past, she has future.

I also LOVED Nora’s relationships with Wes and Iris. The night before the story starts, Wes, Nora’s ex-boyfriend (who had suggested Iris was interested in a relationship with Nora, and whose relationship with Nora ended because of a lack of honesty) walked in on Nora and Iris. I really appreciated that Wes wasn’t upset because his ex was moving on, or was with a girl, but because he and Nora were close friends, and she didn’t tell him. Also because he knew that Nora hadn’t been honest with Iris about her past yet. But it wasn’t anything to do with his pride, and only concern for his friendship with Nora and Nora and Iris’ relationship. Wes said no toxic masculinity in this house.

I also appreciated seeing Nora in therapy. Although she couldn’t be completely honest in her sessions, (because, you know, her life was in danger.) it was really powerful to see her trying to work through her trauma in such a healthy environment.

I absolutely loved this book. Here’s to hoping for a sequel in which we get to see Nora (with the help of Iris and Wes, because let’s be honest, they’re perfect) taking down more of her demons.

Perfect for Reputation era stans,

Rating: 4 out of 5.